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2008
7th February - 24th February
Tactile
Jessica Tyrell

 
Tactile

7 February to 23 February 2008

Exhibition Tactile is part of a curatorial project Fiona Bridger is undertaking as part of an internship at the Chalk Horse Gallery. The aim of this exhibition is for audiences to become aware that art is not just visual, that they can experience art without actually being able to see their work. Art should be enjoyable to everybody, and accessible to everyone.

Jessica Tyrrell has built on her body of work over a number of years within the medium of video art. She has created various vidoe works such as Spaces Between (2004) and Picture This (2006), as well as live audio visual performanaces, such as Homepage at Liquid Architecture festival. These works centre on the poetic use of textual elements as visual motifs that draw on the tradition of “text as image” in visual style. This technique is extended in :the braille box:, as a textual syntax is used metaphorically to describe the language of blindness. The tactile, sensory interface of the Braille operates as the central, unifying motif, physically and conceptually guiding the audience through their experience of the work.

:the braille box: is an audience driven installation that renders and reflects the experience of blindness. The installation uses a series of infra-red sensors that trigger sounds within the physically immersive darkened space of the gallery. The use of interactive art and documentary conventions intersect in the simultaneous narrating and reproducing of experiences the blindness. :the braille box: confronts issues of space and language by placing language literally within space.

People are afraid to break down the stereotype of the gallery because they have been taught that displayed artwork should not be touched. With this exhibition, however, people must break down the stereotype and feel their way around the art.

During this exhibition, the audience are to feel what it is like to be blind, and instead of feeling impaired by it, to use the sensory exclusion to explore the installation, and to break down the taboo of touching artworks, along with dispelling stereotypes that art is visual and only visual.